Submission Title

The Effects of The Menstrual Cycle and Contraceptive Use on Injury in Collegiate Athletes

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of hormone fluctuations in natural menstrual cycles on the rate of injury in collegiate athletes compared to those with less hormonal fluctuation due to estrogen based hormonal contraceptives (HC). This study hypothesized that athletes on their menses, characterized by low levels of estrogen, will have a lower rate of injury than those athletes not on their menses (higher rates of estrogen near ovulation). In addition, we hypothesized that those on a natural cycle will have higher rates of injury than those on HC. METHODS: Female athletes from Linfield University (n=59, ages 18-22 y/o), participating in a collegiate sport were recruited. Participants completed a weekly survey that tracked onset and completion of menses along with new injury occurrences. Injury type was recorded. RESULTS: The analysis showed that the injury rate tended to be lower in athletes that were on contraceptives (9 injuries versus 15 injuries across 12 weeks). In addition, injury rates were much lower during menses compared to the rest of the menstrual cycle, for those not on contraceptives. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that fluctuating hormone levels may affect injury rate in collegiate athletes. The constant hormone levels of contraceptive use may be beneficial in limiting injury.

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May 20th, 9:00 AM May 20th, 3:00 PM

The Effects of The Menstrual Cycle and Contraceptive Use on Injury in Collegiate Athletes

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of hormone fluctuations in natural menstrual cycles on the rate of injury in collegiate athletes compared to those with less hormonal fluctuation due to estrogen based hormonal contraceptives (HC). This study hypothesized that athletes on their menses, characterized by low levels of estrogen, will have a lower rate of injury than those athletes not on their menses (higher rates of estrogen near ovulation). In addition, we hypothesized that those on a natural cycle will have higher rates of injury than those on HC. METHODS: Female athletes from Linfield University (n=59, ages 18-22 y/o), participating in a collegiate sport were recruited. Participants completed a weekly survey that tracked onset and completion of menses along with new injury occurrences. Injury type was recorded. RESULTS: The analysis showed that the injury rate tended to be lower in athletes that were on contraceptives (9 injuries versus 15 injuries across 12 weeks). In addition, injury rates were much lower during menses compared to the rest of the menstrual cycle, for those not on contraceptives. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that fluctuating hormone levels may affect injury rate in collegiate athletes. The constant hormone levels of contraceptive use may be beneficial in limiting injury.