Submission Title

The effects of icing as a recovery method between two bouts of exercise

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine whether ice pack application, following a short bout of exercise, would improve subsequent running-performance 5-6 hours later. METHODS: Fifteen college athletes were split into experimental and control groups, both completed a dynamic warm-up and then a timed ¾ mile run. After finishing the run, all the participants performed a static stretch. The experimental group then iced both legs (calves and quadriceps) for 15 min. All participants returned 5-6 hours later and performed the dynamic warm-up, a timed ¾ mile run, and static stretch again. Participants were surveyed for their beliefs about recovery methods. RESULTS: Both the icing and control groups showed significant improvement in run time in the second bout of running. We found that icing did not impact run performance time. Interestingly, survey results showed that most participants believed that ice packs would be an effective recovery method. This eliminates the possibility of a placebo effect in our run time results. CONCLUSION: We conclude that ice pack cooling did not have a significant effect on a second bout of running performed later in the day.

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The effects of icing as a recovery method between two bouts of exercise

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine whether ice pack application, following a short bout of exercise, would improve subsequent running-performance 5-6 hours later. METHODS: Fifteen college athletes were split into experimental and control groups, both completed a dynamic warm-up and then a timed ¾ mile run. After finishing the run, all the participants performed a static stretch. The experimental group then iced both legs (calves and quadriceps) for 15 min. All participants returned 5-6 hours later and performed the dynamic warm-up, a timed ¾ mile run, and static stretch again. Participants were surveyed for their beliefs about recovery methods. RESULTS: Both the icing and control groups showed significant improvement in run time in the second bout of running. We found that icing did not impact run performance time. Interestingly, survey results showed that most participants believed that ice packs would be an effective recovery method. This eliminates the possibility of a placebo effect in our run time results. CONCLUSION: We conclude that ice pack cooling did not have a significant effect on a second bout of running performed later in the day.