Submission Title

Unveiling the Mask of Post-Race Legitimacy; Preserving White Supremacy through the Use of Colorblind Racism in Policy Preference

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Sociology

Description

Recent literature has illustrated a shifting form of racism from a Jim Crow, overt form to a colorblind, covert form. Although the latter may present itself as more subtle, both forms have served to reinforce the foundation of white supremacy. In order to preserve this foundation, colorblind ideology has been used to implement coded language and race-neutral explanations in policy, reinforcing the existing racial hierarchy in a powerful, but discreet manner. This study utilizes survey data to analyze the relationship between colorblind attitudes and policy preference. It is hypothesized that 1) higher levels of colorblindness will lead to less support for social policies that would benefit racial and ethnic minorities, and 2) Whites will present higher levels of colorblind attitudes than non-Whites. In an online ‘Social Attitudes Survey’, a series of questions determined that while Hypothesis 2 was not supported, with whites and non-whites showing similar levels of colorblindness, Hypothesis 1 was supported, with colorblindness and policy preference presenting a correlation of 0.788, p

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May 20th, 9:00 AM May 20th, 3:00 PM

Unveiling the Mask of Post-Race Legitimacy; Preserving White Supremacy through the Use of Colorblind Racism in Policy Preference

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Recent literature has illustrated a shifting form of racism from a Jim Crow, overt form to a colorblind, covert form. Although the latter may present itself as more subtle, both forms have served to reinforce the foundation of white supremacy. In order to preserve this foundation, colorblind ideology has been used to implement coded language and race-neutral explanations in policy, reinforcing the existing racial hierarchy in a powerful, but discreet manner. This study utilizes survey data to analyze the relationship between colorblind attitudes and policy preference. It is hypothesized that 1) higher levels of colorblindness will lead to less support for social policies that would benefit racial and ethnic minorities, and 2) Whites will present higher levels of colorblind attitudes than non-Whites. In an online ‘Social Attitudes Survey’, a series of questions determined that while Hypothesis 2 was not supported, with whites and non-whites showing similar levels of colorblindness, Hypothesis 1 was supported, with colorblindness and policy preference presenting a correlation of 0.788, p