Submission Title

The Effects of an Arm Care Training Protocol on Shoulder Strength, Mobility, and Pain in Collegiate Softball Players

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine whether an arm care program would improve shoulder strength and mobility while decreasing shoulder pain in female collegiate softball players. Participants (n=13) completed a 4 week training program, meeting 3 times per week (70-90 minutes per session). A variety of exercises were performed (internal/external rotation, scapular pushups, thoracic spine rotations, paloff press, etc.). Pain, internal rotation strength and mobility of the shoulder were tested before and after the 4 week training program. When compared to the pre-test, post-test results showed that mean glenohumeral internal rotation strength significantly increased by 4.8 lbs and mean glenohumeral internal rotation mobility increased by 8.5 degrees. In addition, mean reported shoulder pain decreased by 1.16 on the universal pain scale. In conclusion, this training regime proved to be very successful in both strengthening the shoulder, increasing overall mobility and also aiding in the decrease of perceived shoulder pain.

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The Effects of an Arm Care Training Protocol on Shoulder Strength, Mobility, and Pain in Collegiate Softball Players

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

The purpose of this study was to determine whether an arm care program would improve shoulder strength and mobility while decreasing shoulder pain in female collegiate softball players. Participants (n=13) completed a 4 week training program, meeting 3 times per week (70-90 minutes per session). A variety of exercises were performed (internal/external rotation, scapular pushups, thoracic spine rotations, paloff press, etc.). Pain, internal rotation strength and mobility of the shoulder were tested before and after the 4 week training program. When compared to the pre-test, post-test results showed that mean glenohumeral internal rotation strength significantly increased by 4.8 lbs and mean glenohumeral internal rotation mobility increased by 8.5 degrees. In addition, mean reported shoulder pain decreased by 1.16 on the universal pain scale. In conclusion, this training regime proved to be very successful in both strengthening the shoulder, increasing overall mobility and also aiding in the decrease of perceived shoulder pain.