This submission has been designated as Linfield Access only. It is available only to members of the Linfield community with a valid CatNet ID and password. We apologize for any inconvenience this might cause.

Off-campus Linfield users: To download this submission, please click the button for Off-Campus Download (Linfield users only).

Subject Area

Global Languages and Cultural Studies

Description

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has cost roughly 35 million individuals their lives. While HIV is responsible for the global AIDS pandemic, its emergence can be traced back to colonial Africa. Inspired by Alfred Crosby’s concept of “ecological imperialism,” this work explores the idea of pathogenic imperialism. Ecological imperialism identifies the introduction of disease as one of the reasons colonization was successful. Pathogenic imperialism is the idea that disease was a continuing after-effect of colonization. As European powers expanded their colonial rule over Africa, they created an environment that facilitated the transmission of HIV. HIV evolved from the simian immunodeficiency virus, which is found in chimpanzees in the southeastern region of Cameroon. Following the cut-hunter hypothesis, a Cameroonian hunter slaughtered an infected chimpanzee providing the blood-to-blood contact necessary for transmission. While local populations had previously interacted with these animals, the colonial trade industry pushed villagers further into the wilderness and increased their reliance on bushmeat. During the partition of Africa, King Leopold of Belgian gained the Congo (today’s Democratic Republic of Congo) and created Leopoldville. This urban environment fostered prostitution. Additionally, colonial forces launched vaccination campaigns against tropical diseases, using unsafe medical practices. Colonialism generated the large populations that facilitated disease epidemics and promoted two means of transmission: unsafe sexual practices and unsterile vaccination.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 12:00 AM Apr 26th, 12:00 AM

The Colonization of Africa and the Propagation of HIV

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has cost roughly 35 million individuals their lives. While HIV is responsible for the global AIDS pandemic, its emergence can be traced back to colonial Africa. Inspired by Alfred Crosby’s concept of “ecological imperialism,” this work explores the idea of pathogenic imperialism. Ecological imperialism identifies the introduction of disease as one of the reasons colonization was successful. Pathogenic imperialism is the idea that disease was a continuing after-effect of colonization. As European powers expanded their colonial rule over Africa, they created an environment that facilitated the transmission of HIV. HIV evolved from the simian immunodeficiency virus, which is found in chimpanzees in the southeastern region of Cameroon. Following the cut-hunter hypothesis, a Cameroonian hunter slaughtered an infected chimpanzee providing the blood-to-blood contact necessary for transmission. While local populations had previously interacted with these animals, the colonial trade industry pushed villagers further into the wilderness and increased their reliance on bushmeat. During the partition of Africa, King Leopold of Belgian gained the Congo (today’s Democratic Republic of Congo) and created Leopoldville. This urban environment fostered prostitution. Additionally, colonial forces launched vaccination campaigns against tropical diseases, using unsafe medical practices. Colonialism generated the large populations that facilitated disease epidemics and promoted two means of transmission: unsafe sexual practices and unsterile vaccination.