Submission Title

Kū’ē: Sovereignty and Violence

Subject Area

Political Science

Description

Western sociologists, philosophers, and political scientists alike agree that sovereignty is intimately related to the legitimate capacity for violence. These same scholars rarely consider the colonial context of the United States and the persistent injustices faced by the historically occupied and colonized. When is violence permissible? How does Indigenous sovereignty impact the moral legitimacy of violence? My conceptual analysis is in the context of the historical pattern of US assimilationist tactics and considers radical political thought on violence, sovereignty, and justice. I argue that violence may be permissible when utilized by Indigenous peoples and can be used strategically to decolonize occupied territories.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 12:00 AM Apr 26th, 12:00 AM

Kū’ē: Sovereignty and Violence

Western sociologists, philosophers, and political scientists alike agree that sovereignty is intimately related to the legitimate capacity for violence. These same scholars rarely consider the colonial context of the United States and the persistent injustices faced by the historically occupied and colonized. When is violence permissible? How does Indigenous sovereignty impact the moral legitimacy of violence? My conceptual analysis is in the context of the historical pattern of US assimilationist tactics and considers radical political thought on violence, sovereignty, and justice. I argue that violence may be permissible when utilized by Indigenous peoples and can be used strategically to decolonize occupied territories.