Submission Title

The Effects of Exercise on Cerebral Palsy

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

There is limited research on the effects exercise has on a Cerebral Palsy (CP) diagnosis. The purpose of this case study is to test a modified prolonged muscle stretching protocol to increase range of motion (ROM) and reduce spasticity in the wrist. The client is a 19-year-old male who has CP. The protocol reduced a modern 30-minute prolonged muscle stretching protocol to 10 minutes in three different motions: wrist extension, supination, and pronation. Adaptations were made if the client’s muscle entered a state of spasticity. The client was instructed to complete the exercise once a day. Wrist ROM was measured using a standard goniometer. Measurements were taken at baseline, two weeks, and two weeks after the last session. The protocol was completed nine times in two weeks (64% compliance). Results showed increases in pronation ROM, no change in left supination and left extension, and decreased right supination and right extension ROM. Greater ROM increases independence and quality of life. This case study provides further understanding of the positive effects of exercise on people with CP and increases the awareness of the need for more knowledge regarding the benefits of exercise in CP.

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May 17th, 1:00 PM May 17th, 2:30 PM

The Effects of Exercise on Cerebral Palsy

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

There is limited research on the effects exercise has on a Cerebral Palsy (CP) diagnosis. The purpose of this case study is to test a modified prolonged muscle stretching protocol to increase range of motion (ROM) and reduce spasticity in the wrist. The client is a 19-year-old male who has CP. The protocol reduced a modern 30-minute prolonged muscle stretching protocol to 10 minutes in three different motions: wrist extension, supination, and pronation. Adaptations were made if the client’s muscle entered a state of spasticity. The client was instructed to complete the exercise once a day. Wrist ROM was measured using a standard goniometer. Measurements were taken at baseline, two weeks, and two weeks after the last session. The protocol was completed nine times in two weeks (64% compliance). Results showed increases in pronation ROM, no change in left supination and left extension, and decreased right supination and right extension ROM. Greater ROM increases independence and quality of life. This case study provides further understanding of the positive effects of exercise on people with CP and increases the awareness of the need for more knowledge regarding the benefits of exercise in CP.