Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

Poor nutrition in college football players leads to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome associated conditions. This study compared the dietary intake of Division I (DI) and III (DIII) football players. A total of 31 players completed testing this fall. Variables included height, weight, and a 24-hour diet recall. A 5-pass interview was used to collect nutrition and processed by the ESHA Food Processor program. Data were compared using an independent t-test and a Pearson r correlation test. There were no significant differences between BMI, total caloric intake, carbohydrate, fat, water, fiber, or micronutrients. DI players consumed a higher percentage of calories from protein. Using BMI, 67% of DI and 81% of DIII players were classified overweight and 19% of DI and 40% of DIII players were classified obese. There was a significant negative correlation of BMI with fiber and relative protein intake. All players met the Dietary Reference Intakes except for carbohydrate and potassium. Of concern are cholesterol and sodium levels. Data showed higher BMI correlated with poor diet choices. BMI is not an accurate measure and future analysis will include body composition. Athletes should work with health professionals to maximize performance and decrease metabolic syndrome associated conditions.

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May 17th, 1:00 PM May 17th, 2:30 PM

Dietary Intake of Collegiate NCAA Football Players: Division I vs. Division III

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Poor nutrition in college football players leads to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome associated conditions. This study compared the dietary intake of Division I (DI) and III (DIII) football players. A total of 31 players completed testing this fall. Variables included height, weight, and a 24-hour diet recall. A 5-pass interview was used to collect nutrition and processed by the ESHA Food Processor program. Data were compared using an independent t-test and a Pearson r correlation test. There were no significant differences between BMI, total caloric intake, carbohydrate, fat, water, fiber, or micronutrients. DI players consumed a higher percentage of calories from protein. Using BMI, 67% of DI and 81% of DIII players were classified overweight and 19% of DI and 40% of DIII players were classified obese. There was a significant negative correlation of BMI with fiber and relative protein intake. All players met the Dietary Reference Intakes except for carbohydrate and potassium. Of concern are cholesterol and sodium levels. Data showed higher BMI correlated with poor diet choices. BMI is not an accurate measure and future analysis will include body composition. Athletes should work with health professionals to maximize performance and decrease metabolic syndrome associated conditions.

 

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