Submission Title

NCAA Division III Football Players' Dietary Intake: In-Season Vs. Off-Season

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the diet of Division III football players in- and off-season and to identify the differences between skilled and unskilled players.

METHODS: Twenty-two players [18.9 + 0.79 yr] completed in-season (F, Fall) and off-season (S, Spring) testing. Data included height, weight, body composition, and a 24-hour diet recall using the 5-pass method.

RESULTS: All players gained weight (F: 86.1 ± 13.1 kg; S: 92.0 ± 12.8 kg, p = 0.033) by spring. The weight gain was associated with an increase in percentage body fat (F: 13.8 ± 4.6; S: 16.3 ± 4.4, p = 0.028). All players decreased total caloric intake in the spring (F: 5553 ± 1922 kcal; S: 3972 ± 1384 kcal, p = 0.0008). There were no differences in total calories, macronutrient composition, relative protein intake, sodium, or cholesterol between the skilled and unskilled players.

CONCLUSION: Body weight and percent body fat increased from Fall to Spring with an associated increased caloric intake during the season. It is important for players to make dietary choices to maximize performance and reduce long-term health risks within the constraints of eating at the college dining hall.

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NCAA Division III Football Players' Dietary Intake: In-Season Vs. Off-Season

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the diet of Division III football players in- and off-season and to identify the differences between skilled and unskilled players.

METHODS: Twenty-two players [18.9 + 0.79 yr] completed in-season (F, Fall) and off-season (S, Spring) testing. Data included height, weight, body composition, and a 24-hour diet recall using the 5-pass method.

RESULTS: All players gained weight (F: 86.1 ± 13.1 kg; S: 92.0 ± 12.8 kg, p = 0.033) by spring. The weight gain was associated with an increase in percentage body fat (F: 13.8 ± 4.6; S: 16.3 ± 4.4, p = 0.028). All players decreased total caloric intake in the spring (F: 5553 ± 1922 kcal; S: 3972 ± 1384 kcal, p = 0.0008). There were no differences in total calories, macronutrient composition, relative protein intake, sodium, or cholesterol between the skilled and unskilled players.

CONCLUSION: Body weight and percent body fat increased from Fall to Spring with an associated increased caloric intake during the season. It is important for players to make dietary choices to maximize performance and reduce long-term health risks within the constraints of eating at the college dining hall.