Submission Title

Militarism in the U.S.: The Post-2001 Diaspora of Security Aid

Location

Vivian A. Bull Music Center: Delkin Recital Hall

Subject Area

Political Science

Description

This study focuses on the shift in security aid authorities from the Department of State to the Department of Defense, determining whether or not this shift demonstrates a militarization of United States foreign policy. Specifically, it looks at budget trends and the impact of the shift in authorities on the inter-agency process. Using a comparative approach, the study shows how the shift in responsibility over security aid has occurred at a higher rate post-9/11 and argues the inter-agency process has suffered as a consequence of this shift. The findings suggest the inter-agency process of delivering security aid has contributed to the militarization of U.S. diplomacy, which may be heightened as a result of the current administration’s aim to cut the Department of State’s budget even further.

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Militarism in the U.S.: The Post-2001 Diaspora of Security Aid

Vivian A. Bull Music Center: Delkin Recital Hall

This study focuses on the shift in security aid authorities from the Department of State to the Department of Defense, determining whether or not this shift demonstrates a militarization of United States foreign policy. Specifically, it looks at budget trends and the impact of the shift in authorities on the inter-agency process. Using a comparative approach, the study shows how the shift in responsibility over security aid has occurred at a higher rate post-9/11 and argues the inter-agency process has suffered as a consequence of this shift. The findings suggest the inter-agency process of delivering security aid has contributed to the militarization of U.S. diplomacy, which may be heightened as a result of the current administration’s aim to cut the Department of State’s budget even further.