Submission Title

Europe

Location

Vivian A. Bull Music Center: Delkin Recital Hall

Subject Area

Music

Description

Europe for Two-Channel Fixed Media (2019) is a collection of nine pieces composed of diverse, modern, and geographically relevant field recordings taken on a cell phone. Continuity of the collection is established by each piece being composed exclusively of environmental recordings from the location of their title. Composers are often inspired by, or mimic, the environment in their work. This collection allows for the environment to speak for itself and uses music as the organizational tool in which to present and interpret it. The field recordings range from traffic signals, shattering ice, and subway trains, to pub chatter, laughter, waves, and more. Few of these sounds, however, are presented organically. Rather, they are manipulated, re-pitched, slowed down, sped up, reversed, and more to explore their musical properties. The sounds of cities are typically lost in their environments, though with music technology their sonic potential is greatly enhanced and these cityscapes become immortalized through intentional instrumentation. The task of this collection is to challenge our preconceived notions of these places and to appreciate the similarities and differences of modern European soundscapes.

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Europe

Vivian A. Bull Music Center: Delkin Recital Hall

Europe for Two-Channel Fixed Media (2019) is a collection of nine pieces composed of diverse, modern, and geographically relevant field recordings taken on a cell phone. Continuity of the collection is established by each piece being composed exclusively of environmental recordings from the location of their title. Composers are often inspired by, or mimic, the environment in their work. This collection allows for the environment to speak for itself and uses music as the organizational tool in which to present and interpret it. The field recordings range from traffic signals, shattering ice, and subway trains, to pub chatter, laughter, waves, and more. Few of these sounds, however, are presented organically. Rather, they are manipulated, re-pitched, slowed down, sped up, reversed, and more to explore their musical properties. The sounds of cities are typically lost in their environments, though with music technology their sonic potential is greatly enhanced and these cityscapes become immortalized through intentional instrumentation. The task of this collection is to challenge our preconceived notions of these places and to appreciate the similarities and differences of modern European soundscapes.