Submission Title

The Impact of Music and Television on Time Trial Cycling Performance

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of external stimuli, such as music and television, on cycling performance.

Methods: Nine participants (19.2 years, 1 male and 8 females) completed three 15-minute time trials on three separate days with randomized external stimuli of control (no stimuli), music, and television. Heart rate (HR) was recorded every minute, rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was recorded every three minutes, and total kcals expended was recorded at the end of each trial.

Results: Average HR for the TV trial was lower than music and control (141, 154, and 152 bpm, respectively, p < 0.05). Average RPE for the control trial was higher than both music and TV trials (12.5, 11.7, and 11.5, respectively, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between total kcals expended.

Discussion: Our results suggest that TV as a distractor during exercise may result in a decreased intensity workout. With no stimuli, the participants felt like they were working harder compared to TV and music. Having some sort of stimuli creates the idea of an easier workout, but the type of stimuli makes a difference in the actual intensity of the workout.

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The Impact of Music and Television on Time Trial Cycling Performance

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of external stimuli, such as music and television, on cycling performance.

Methods: Nine participants (19.2 years, 1 male and 8 females) completed three 15-minute time trials on three separate days with randomized external stimuli of control (no stimuli), music, and television. Heart rate (HR) was recorded every minute, rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was recorded every three minutes, and total kcals expended was recorded at the end of each trial.

Results: Average HR for the TV trial was lower than music and control (141, 154, and 152 bpm, respectively, p < 0.05). Average RPE for the control trial was higher than both music and TV trials (12.5, 11.7, and 11.5, respectively, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between total kcals expended.

Discussion: Our results suggest that TV as a distractor during exercise may result in a decreased intensity workout. With no stimuli, the participants felt like they were working harder compared to TV and music. Having some sort of stimuli creates the idea of an easier workout, but the type of stimuli makes a difference in the actual intensity of the workout.