Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

Purpose: Pre-workout nutrition is important in exercise training and is often overlooked or misunderstood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pre-workout meals high in carbohydrates or lipids on muscular endurance in lower body muscles and fatigue during a back squat exercise in physically active college students.

Methods: All subjects (n = 8) reported to the lab 2 times, with 24-48 hours of rest between sessions. Subjects’ height, weight, and blood pressure were taken before each session. Subjects were led through a dynamic warm-up consisting of foam rolling, dynamic stretching, and barbell back squat warm-ups every session. Session one was for estimation of subjects’ back squat 1-repetition maximum (1RM) using a PUSH-Strength accelerometer-based velocity tool. During the second session, participants were instructed to consume a carbohydrate or lipid bar and wait 45 minutes for digestion. Subjects then completed the warm-up and performed one back squat set to failure using 75% of their predicted 1RM.

Results: The carbohydrate group performed more repetitions and lifted for a longer time than the lipid group (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Our data suggest that a carbohydrate-heavy meal immediately prior is beneficial to maximize muscular endurance in resistance training.

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 10:30 AM

The Effects of Pre-Workout Meals High in Carbohydrates or Lipids on Muscle Fatigue during Resistance Exercise: A Pilot Study

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Purpose: Pre-workout nutrition is important in exercise training and is often overlooked or misunderstood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pre-workout meals high in carbohydrates or lipids on muscular endurance in lower body muscles and fatigue during a back squat exercise in physically active college students.

Methods: All subjects (n = 8) reported to the lab 2 times, with 24-48 hours of rest between sessions. Subjects’ height, weight, and blood pressure were taken before each session. Subjects were led through a dynamic warm-up consisting of foam rolling, dynamic stretching, and barbell back squat warm-ups every session. Session one was for estimation of subjects’ back squat 1-repetition maximum (1RM) using a PUSH-Strength accelerometer-based velocity tool. During the second session, participants were instructed to consume a carbohydrate or lipid bar and wait 45 minutes for digestion. Subjects then completed the warm-up and performed one back squat set to failure using 75% of their predicted 1RM.

Results: The carbohydrate group performed more repetitions and lifted for a longer time than the lipid group (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Our data suggest that a carbohydrate-heavy meal immediately prior is beneficial to maximize muscular endurance in resistance training.

 

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