Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

Regular physical activity (PA) is well known to positively impact physical and mental health outcomes. In our work to examine cardiovascular benefits of PA in a mouse model of posttraumatic stress, we stumbled upon the reciprocal relationship between PA and stress exposure, wherein stress significantly reduced healthy levels of routine PA. The aim of the present studies was to define the parameters of our paradigm. C67BL/6J male mice were divided into four groups (n=8/group): sedentary/control, voluntary running/control, sedentary/stress, and voluntary running/stress. Voluntary running groups were given unlimited access to a running wheel for 9 weeks. Stress groups were then exposed to a 5-day resident-intruder social stress that models human posttraumatic stress. Running behavior essentially ceased following stress. Habituation to stress occurred, as running distance increased by the 5th day of stress but remained significantly low. A separate study examined a single exposure to resident-intruder social stress. Plasma corticosterone significantly increased while nightly running dropped significantly but returned to normal by the 3rd night post-stress. These studies show the sensitivity of habitual running behavior to stress exposure and suggest the utility of this mouse model in exploring the means by which stress negatively impacts routine PA.

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 10:30 AM

Cessation of Nightly Voluntary Wheel Running Activity Following Exposure to a Mouse Model of Posttraumatic Stress

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Regular physical activity (PA) is well known to positively impact physical and mental health outcomes. In our work to examine cardiovascular benefits of PA in a mouse model of posttraumatic stress, we stumbled upon the reciprocal relationship between PA and stress exposure, wherein stress significantly reduced healthy levels of routine PA. The aim of the present studies was to define the parameters of our paradigm. C67BL/6J male mice were divided into four groups (n=8/group): sedentary/control, voluntary running/control, sedentary/stress, and voluntary running/stress. Voluntary running groups were given unlimited access to a running wheel for 9 weeks. Stress groups were then exposed to a 5-day resident-intruder social stress that models human posttraumatic stress. Running behavior essentially ceased following stress. Habituation to stress occurred, as running distance increased by the 5th day of stress but remained significantly low. A separate study examined a single exposure to resident-intruder social stress. Plasma corticosterone significantly increased while nightly running dropped significantly but returned to normal by the 3rd night post-stress. These studies show the sensitivity of habitual running behavior to stress exposure and suggest the utility of this mouse model in exploring the means by which stress negatively impacts routine PA.

 

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