Submission Title

Engineering a Zero-Carbon Emission, Solar-Electric Vehicle

Subject Area

Physics/Applied Physics

Description

Green energy is the future. The U.S. Department of Energy, as well as some of the nation's leading economists, have predicted that within the next 30 years 80% of our energy will come from renewable sources. This is due to the continual rise in the greenhouse gases and pollutions that cause climate change. One major source of pollution that is depleting our ozone layer stems from our automotive vehicles. As this emerging technology develops, it will continue to revolutionize the transportation industry. Transportation will become lighter, faster, safer, and cheaper. This is why I successfully engineered a multipurpose vehicle that can perpetually run on solar electric energy with zero carbon emissions. Through torque, voltage, current, and power calculations, I was able to apply physics and physical chemistry theory to help integrate a 365-Watt solar panel into the body of a dual battery powered electric vehicle.

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May 5th, 12:00 AM May 5th, 12:00 AM

Engineering a Zero-Carbon Emission, Solar-Electric Vehicle

Green energy is the future. The U.S. Department of Energy, as well as some of the nation's leading economists, have predicted that within the next 30 years 80% of our energy will come from renewable sources. This is due to the continual rise in the greenhouse gases and pollutions that cause climate change. One major source of pollution that is depleting our ozone layer stems from our automotive vehicles. As this emerging technology develops, it will continue to revolutionize the transportation industry. Transportation will become lighter, faster, safer, and cheaper. This is why I successfully engineered a multipurpose vehicle that can perpetually run on solar electric energy with zero carbon emissions. Through torque, voltage, current, and power calculations, I was able to apply physics and physical chemistry theory to help integrate a 365-Watt solar panel into the body of a dual battery powered electric vehicle.