Submission Title

Energy and Macronutrient Intake of First-Year Football Players: A Pilot Study

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the energy intake and macronutrient breakdown of first-year football players at a Division III school. A secondary purpose was to examine the relationship of dietary intake to clinical measures.

Methods: Seventeen first-year football players completed a 24-Hour Diet Recall interview. Players had their height, weight, body composition, fasting blood glucose and cholesterol measured. Researchers provided measuring devices to help participants recall their food and liquid intake for the previous 24 hours. Independent T-tests were performed to examine the differences between skilled and lineman football players.

Results: The athletes consumed an average of 4,103 kcals (range 1,283.4 kcals – 8,347.3 kcals) with the following macronutrient breakdown: 48% Carbohydrate, 35% Fat and 17% protein. Lineman were heavier, had higher Body Mass Index (BMI), larger waist circumferences (WC), higher percent body fat (BF), and higher fasting blood glucoses (p > 0.05) than the skilled players. There were no differences in total kcals consumed, macronutrient composition, or water intake between two groups.

Conclusion: Skilled and lineman football players had similar energy intakes; lineman had higher BMIs, WC, and BF. This would suggest that lineman expend lower amounts of energy than skilled players. This information combined with the higher blood glucose levels can be an indicator for a football player’s future health.

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Energy and Macronutrient Intake of First-Year Football Players: A Pilot Study

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the energy intake and macronutrient breakdown of first-year football players at a Division III school. A secondary purpose was to examine the relationship of dietary intake to clinical measures.

Methods: Seventeen first-year football players completed a 24-Hour Diet Recall interview. Players had their height, weight, body composition, fasting blood glucose and cholesterol measured. Researchers provided measuring devices to help participants recall their food and liquid intake for the previous 24 hours. Independent T-tests were performed to examine the differences between skilled and lineman football players.

Results: The athletes consumed an average of 4,103 kcals (range 1,283.4 kcals – 8,347.3 kcals) with the following macronutrient breakdown: 48% Carbohydrate, 35% Fat and 17% protein. Lineman were heavier, had higher Body Mass Index (BMI), larger waist circumferences (WC), higher percent body fat (BF), and higher fasting blood glucoses (p > 0.05) than the skilled players. There were no differences in total kcals consumed, macronutrient composition, or water intake between two groups.

Conclusion: Skilled and lineman football players had similar energy intakes; lineman had higher BMIs, WC, and BF. This would suggest that lineman expend lower amounts of energy than skilled players. This information combined with the higher blood glucose levels can be an indicator for a football player’s future health.