Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Biochemistry

Description

The central dogma theory relates how DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNAs) and then translated into proteins. Since the nucleus contains the majority of the DNA in cells, research related to transcription and translation focuses on these processes within the nucleus and cytosol; however, these processes are also taking place within the mitochondrial organelle. Mitochondria are most widely known for their essential role in producing energy for the cell, but the organelle also contains its own small, circular genome. Transcription of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) follows similar mechanisms as does transcription of nuclear DNA. During this essential process, specific mitochondrial transcription factors, such as TFAM and TFB2M, regulate the attachment of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) to the promoter and initiation of transcription. With a fully functioning mitochondrial RNA polymerase, transcription is properly conducted, and transcripts can be translated to protein by the mitochondrial ribosome. Mitochondrial transcription is a major regulatory process within the organelle, and determining transcription factors involved in this control point is important for understanding mitochondrial function and many diseases relating to mitochondrial dysfunction.

Numerous transcription factors are found both in the nucleus as well as in the mitochondria where their function is not well understood. One such transcription factor is the thyroid hormone receptor. Previous research suggests that when the hormone triiodothyronine (T3) is present and taken up in cells, mitochondrial transcription increases. The mechanism behind the T3 stimulation of transcription is thought to be a coordinated effect by interacting with both the mitochondrial and nuclear thyroid hormone receptor. Our aim is to analyze the level of interaction that the mitochondrial thyroid hormone receptor (mt-TRalpha1) has with the mitochondrial DNA and other core mitochondrial transcription factors in the presence and absence of the T3 hormone. With this information, we further understand another component of mitochondrial transcription that could have implications in mitochondrial dysfunction and disease.

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May 5th, 3:00 PM May 5th, 4:30 PM

In Vitro Analysis of the Thyroid Hormone Receptor in Mitochondrial Transcription

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

The central dogma theory relates how DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNAs) and then translated into proteins. Since the nucleus contains the majority of the DNA in cells, research related to transcription and translation focuses on these processes within the nucleus and cytosol; however, these processes are also taking place within the mitochondrial organelle. Mitochondria are most widely known for their essential role in producing energy for the cell, but the organelle also contains its own small, circular genome. Transcription of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) follows similar mechanisms as does transcription of nuclear DNA. During this essential process, specific mitochondrial transcription factors, such as TFAM and TFB2M, regulate the attachment of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) to the promoter and initiation of transcription. With a fully functioning mitochondrial RNA polymerase, transcription is properly conducted, and transcripts can be translated to protein by the mitochondrial ribosome. Mitochondrial transcription is a major regulatory process within the organelle, and determining transcription factors involved in this control point is important for understanding mitochondrial function and many diseases relating to mitochondrial dysfunction.

Numerous transcription factors are found both in the nucleus as well as in the mitochondria where their function is not well understood. One such transcription factor is the thyroid hormone receptor. Previous research suggests that when the hormone triiodothyronine (T3) is present and taken up in cells, mitochondrial transcription increases. The mechanism behind the T3 stimulation of transcription is thought to be a coordinated effect by interacting with both the mitochondrial and nuclear thyroid hormone receptor. Our aim is to analyze the level of interaction that the mitochondrial thyroid hormone receptor (mt-TRalpha1) has with the mitochondrial DNA and other core mitochondrial transcription factors in the presence and absence of the T3 hormone. With this information, we further understand another component of mitochondrial transcription that could have implications in mitochondrial dysfunction and disease.

 

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