Submission Title

Evaluation of the Prerequisite Requirements in Principles of Economics and Student Success at Linfield College

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Economics

Description

This paper examines the prerequisite requirements and factors affecting success on assessment test results principles of economics courses at Linfield College over the years 2009-2015 using a censored regression model. We group our explanatory factors in three categories: prerequisites, student characteristics before enrolling at Linfield, and student characteristics after enrolling at Linfield. Among the prerequisites, we find that an SAT math score above 500 improves results on both the pre- and post-assessment tests. From the before-characteristics, the number of AP credits a student enters Linfield with has a positive impact on student performance on both the pre- and post-tests. From the after-characteristics, we find that students taking the course for a major requirement performed worse on the post-test.

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Evaluation of the Prerequisite Requirements in Principles of Economics and Student Success at Linfield College

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

This paper examines the prerequisite requirements and factors affecting success on assessment test results principles of economics courses at Linfield College over the years 2009-2015 using a censored regression model. We group our explanatory factors in three categories: prerequisites, student characteristics before enrolling at Linfield, and student characteristics after enrolling at Linfield. Among the prerequisites, we find that an SAT math score above 500 improves results on both the pre- and post-assessment tests. From the before-characteristics, the number of AP credits a student enters Linfield with has a positive impact on student performance on both the pre- and post-tests. From the after-characteristics, we find that students taking the course for a major requirement performed worse on the post-test.