Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Nursing

Description

Florence Nightingale said, “Unnecessary noise is the cruelest absence of care.” During inpatient hospitalizations, frequent awakenings and a high level of ambient noise prevent restful sleep in many patients. Awakenings are inevitable for the health and safety of patients; however, many hospitals have improved patient sleep quality by implementing 2-3 hour periods devoted to patient rest. These periods, called “quiet hours,” are a specified time during which noise levels are restricted and non-urgent interruptions are prohibited. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of “quiet hours” on a med-surg floor.

During a four-week period, patients hospitalized for at least one night on the med-surg floor of a local hospital were surveyed regarding their sleep quality. These results, coupled with research on the benefits of sleep, were presented to the nurse manager of the floor. Using these results, as well as the results of the hospital’s most recent HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems), the utility of “quiet hours” could be weighed against the challenges.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
May 5th, 3:00 PM May 5th, 4:30 PM

The Benefits of Sleep During Hospitalization: A Survey to Determine the Utility of Quiet Hours on a Med-Surg Floor

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Florence Nightingale said, “Unnecessary noise is the cruelest absence of care.” During inpatient hospitalizations, frequent awakenings and a high level of ambient noise prevent restful sleep in many patients. Awakenings are inevitable for the health and safety of patients; however, many hospitals have improved patient sleep quality by implementing 2-3 hour periods devoted to patient rest. These periods, called “quiet hours,” are a specified time during which noise levels are restricted and non-urgent interruptions are prohibited. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of “quiet hours” on a med-surg floor.

During a four-week period, patients hospitalized for at least one night on the med-surg floor of a local hospital were surveyed regarding their sleep quality. These results, coupled with research on the benefits of sleep, were presented to the nurse manager of the floor. Using these results, as well as the results of the hospital’s most recent HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems), the utility of “quiet hours” could be weighed against the challenges.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.