Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Anthropology

Description

The purpose of this study is to explore the intersections of masculinity, rurality, the family, and economics through the experiences of commercial fishermen in Alaska. Understanding masculinity as plural and the rural space as a sphere in which individuals operate, this study examines the relationship between the masculine rural and the rural masculine and how it pertains to commercial fishermen. I focus on the discourse already present about Alaska and commercial fishermen and combine this approach with notions of cultural and economic capital, as well as the local ecological knowledge (LEK). The fishermen describe their experiences in the industry as ones that are rooted in family influence and economic gain, while also believing that, in order to make money, a “true fisherman” needs to be able to learn fast and endure what the industry throws at them. This study adds to the body of knowledge already put forth about rural masculinities and offers a different approach to understanding a subculture that is rarely looked at today.

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May 5th, 9:00 AM May 5th, 10:30 AM

The Off-Season: Masculinities, Rurality, & Family Ties in Alaska Commercial Fishermen

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

The purpose of this study is to explore the intersections of masculinity, rurality, the family, and economics through the experiences of commercial fishermen in Alaska. Understanding masculinity as plural and the rural space as a sphere in which individuals operate, this study examines the relationship between the masculine rural and the rural masculine and how it pertains to commercial fishermen. I focus on the discourse already present about Alaska and commercial fishermen and combine this approach with notions of cultural and economic capital, as well as the local ecological knowledge (LEK). The fishermen describe their experiences in the industry as ones that are rooted in family influence and economic gain, while also believing that, in order to make money, a “true fisherman” needs to be able to learn fast and endure what the industry throws at them. This study adds to the body of knowledge already put forth about rural masculinities and offers a different approach to understanding a subculture that is rarely looked at today.

 

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