Submission Title

Comparing the Effects of Kettlebell and Barbell Exercises on Vertical Jump, Broad Jump, and a 20-Meter Sprint

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

To support and maintain health, it is recommended that adults train each major muscle group with resistance at least two days a week. Kettlebell exercises are increasingly popular in workout programs and are relatively easy to teach to untrained or unfit populations. However, limited research has studied the effects of kettlebell training in enhancing functional performance compared to traditional weightlifting.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether kettlebell or barbell exercises are optimal for increasing functional movements in untrained individuals. We hypothesized that functional movement would be improved in both exercise training groups with a significantly greater increase in all measurements for the group undergoing kettlebell training.

Methods: Collegiate male (n=5) and female (n=10) participants were randomized into two groups: kettlebell training or barbell training. Training consisted of 1-hour sessions, twice a week for four weeks. Tests of vertical jump, broad jump, and 20-meter sprints were measured before and after the training period.

Results: Repeated measures ANOVA with group as a between factor showed that functional performance in vertical jump, broad jump, and 20-meter sprint did not change following the four-week training period with either kettlebell or barbell group.

Conclusion: A four-week training program in untrained individuals is not sufficient to show gains in performance regardless of the type of resistance training. This may be due to less muscle memory and/or slower muscle adaptation and growth. Future research should expand the training period to further investigate the potential benefits of kettlebells on functional performance.

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Comparing the Effects of Kettlebell and Barbell Exercises on Vertical Jump, Broad Jump, and a 20-Meter Sprint

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

To support and maintain health, it is recommended that adults train each major muscle group with resistance at least two days a week. Kettlebell exercises are increasingly popular in workout programs and are relatively easy to teach to untrained or unfit populations. However, limited research has studied the effects of kettlebell training in enhancing functional performance compared to traditional weightlifting.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether kettlebell or barbell exercises are optimal for increasing functional movements in untrained individuals. We hypothesized that functional movement would be improved in both exercise training groups with a significantly greater increase in all measurements for the group undergoing kettlebell training.

Methods: Collegiate male (n=5) and female (n=10) participants were randomized into two groups: kettlebell training or barbell training. Training consisted of 1-hour sessions, twice a week for four weeks. Tests of vertical jump, broad jump, and 20-meter sprints were measured before and after the training period.

Results: Repeated measures ANOVA with group as a between factor showed that functional performance in vertical jump, broad jump, and 20-meter sprint did not change following the four-week training period with either kettlebell or barbell group.

Conclusion: A four-week training program in untrained individuals is not sufficient to show gains in performance regardless of the type of resistance training. This may be due to less muscle memory and/or slower muscle adaptation and growth. Future research should expand the training period to further investigate the potential benefits of kettlebells on functional performance.