Submission Title

The Effects of an Aquatic Exercise Program on Dynamic and Static Balance of Sedentary Elders

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Subject Area

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

Description

Risk of falling is a serious health concern in the elderly population. Thirty to fifty percent of those over 65 years of age experience accidental falls every year. For the elderly, risk factors associated with falling include the loss of muscle strength, and impairments in stability and balance (Cho & An, 2014). Therefore, a consistent exercise routine that involves strengthening the musculature of the lower limbs and abdominal core has been recommended to improve balance and prevent falls.

Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to measure the effects of an aquatic exercise program on the static and dynamic balance of sedentary elderly individuals, and to determine whether balance gains diminish following the cessation of an exercise program.

Methods: Six elderly individuals were recruited from the local community (mean age 74 ± 6.6; four females and two males) to participate in a six-week aquatic exercise protocol. The exercise program consisted of two one-hour-long sessions a week, focusing on lower-limb muscle strengthening and core stability. The Berg Balance Scale and the Fullerton Advanced Balance were used to assess static and dynamic balance respectively. The tests were administered before and after the exercise protocol, and then upon cessation of the program, once a week for the following four weeks. In addition, a 10-minute interview was conducted with each participant after the last exercise session to obtain qualitative measures.

Results:Repeated measures ANOVA analysis revealed gains in both static (p

Conclusion: This study demonstrated that aquatic exercise training improved balance in our elderly population. Furthermore, balance gains were maintained throughout the weekly balance testing following the exercise period. The qualitative portion of the study conveyed perceived improvements in balance and self-confidence to accomplish daily tasks. It also indicated that a training exercise protocol made the participants more aware of their balance and encouraged them to continue practicing to improve or maintain their balance.

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The Effects of an Aquatic Exercise Program on Dynamic and Static Balance of Sedentary Elders

Jereld R. Nicholson Library: Grand Avenue

Risk of falling is a serious health concern in the elderly population. Thirty to fifty percent of those over 65 years of age experience accidental falls every year. For the elderly, risk factors associated with falling include the loss of muscle strength, and impairments in stability and balance (Cho & An, 2014). Therefore, a consistent exercise routine that involves strengthening the musculature of the lower limbs and abdominal core has been recommended to improve balance and prevent falls.

Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to measure the effects of an aquatic exercise program on the static and dynamic balance of sedentary elderly individuals, and to determine whether balance gains diminish following the cessation of an exercise program.

Methods: Six elderly individuals were recruited from the local community (mean age 74 ± 6.6; four females and two males) to participate in a six-week aquatic exercise protocol. The exercise program consisted of two one-hour-long sessions a week, focusing on lower-limb muscle strengthening and core stability. The Berg Balance Scale and the Fullerton Advanced Balance were used to assess static and dynamic balance respectively. The tests were administered before and after the exercise protocol, and then upon cessation of the program, once a week for the following four weeks. In addition, a 10-minute interview was conducted with each participant after the last exercise session to obtain qualitative measures.

Results:Repeated measures ANOVA analysis revealed gains in both static (p

Conclusion: This study demonstrated that aquatic exercise training improved balance in our elderly population. Furthermore, balance gains were maintained throughout the weekly balance testing following the exercise period. The qualitative portion of the study conveyed perceived improvements in balance and self-confidence to accomplish daily tasks. It also indicated that a training exercise protocol made the participants more aware of their balance and encouraged them to continue practicing to improve or maintain their balance.