Submission Title

Voicing Their Experiences: The Narrative Analysis of Rape Stories by College Women

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Subject Area

Communication Arts/Rhetoric

Description

The relevance of the topic of sexual assault on college and university campuses for today’s college generation has been discussed widely in the media, particularly in coverage since the summer of 2014. With the media spotlight on this issue, it has become clear that there are obvious issues with outdated campus policies that often act as barriers to victims coming forward and reporting their assaults. This analysis examined the narratives of three college women who were victims of sexual assault. They included two opinion editorial letters by victims published by their school’s newspapers and the first chapter of Alice Sebold’s memoir, Lucky. These stories detail the realities victims face and have helped pave the path for other victims. Using narrative criticism as a frame, this essay examines the rape myths that surround men and women and the ways in which rape is acknowledged and not acknowledged on college campuses.

The paper upon which this poster was based was written for the Senior Seminar course in Communication Arts.

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Voicing Their Experiences: The Narrative Analysis of Rape Stories by College Women

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

The relevance of the topic of sexual assault on college and university campuses for today’s college generation has been discussed widely in the media, particularly in coverage since the summer of 2014. With the media spotlight on this issue, it has become clear that there are obvious issues with outdated campus policies that often act as barriers to victims coming forward and reporting their assaults. This analysis examined the narratives of three college women who were victims of sexual assault. They included two opinion editorial letters by victims published by their school’s newspapers and the first chapter of Alice Sebold’s memoir, Lucky. These stories detail the realities victims face and have helped pave the path for other victims. Using narrative criticism as a frame, this essay examines the rape myths that surround men and women and the ways in which rape is acknowledged and not acknowledged on college campuses.

The paper upon which this poster was based was written for the Senior Seminar course in Communication Arts.