Submission Title

The Mine Ban Convention: A Justified Success or Just Another Naked Emperor?

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Subject Area

Political Science

Description

The Mine Ban Convention (MBC) has been heralded as one of the most effective treaties in the post-Cold War era due to an unprecedented rate of compliance: 162 out of 190 states have ratified the treaty and 84% of members have destroyed 90% of stockpiled Anti-personnel (AP) landmines worldwide. However, a case study of the treaty to ban AP landmines demonstrates that measuring effectiveness through compliance may have dangerously distorted our perceptions of treaty success. In the case of the MBC, equating compliance with effectiveness has caused scholars to overlook unintended consequences of the treaty, including environmental damage and the economic burden of landmine removal. Furthermore, this approach turns the treaty into a government initiative that places more emphasis on state participation than realistic humanitarian outreach. This study proposes that achieving humanitarian goals in the MBC and similar treaties ultimately depends on emphasizing the resolution of problems shared by the entire global community over threats to individual states, which can be accomplished by re-examining problems through the lens of common security.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
May 15th, 12:15 PM May 15th, 1:30 PM

The Mine Ban Convention: A Justified Success or Just Another Naked Emperor?

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

The Mine Ban Convention (MBC) has been heralded as one of the most effective treaties in the post-Cold War era due to an unprecedented rate of compliance: 162 out of 190 states have ratified the treaty and 84% of members have destroyed 90% of stockpiled Anti-personnel (AP) landmines worldwide. However, a case study of the treaty to ban AP landmines demonstrates that measuring effectiveness through compliance may have dangerously distorted our perceptions of treaty success. In the case of the MBC, equating compliance with effectiveness has caused scholars to overlook unintended consequences of the treaty, including environmental damage and the economic burden of landmine removal. Furthermore, this approach turns the treaty into a government initiative that places more emphasis on state participation than realistic humanitarian outreach. This study proposes that achieving humanitarian goals in the MBC and similar treaties ultimately depends on emphasizing the resolution of problems shared by the entire global community over threats to individual states, which can be accomplished by re-examining problems through the lens of common security.