Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Subject Area

Environmental Studies (science focus)

Description

Previous work by Dr. Nancy Broshot has revealed high tree mortality and low recruitment (new seedlings) in an urban forest (Forest Park in Portland, Oregon). A series of lichen surveys in 2013 showed the lichen community has shifted to one dominated by lichens tolerant of and thriving on high nitrogen levels. To ascertain if nitrogenous air pollution could be a cause of low recruitment, we measured the level of nitrogen and carbon in the soil at 32 sites in Forest Park (24 permanent sites and 8 conifer recruitment sites). We also added 3 control sites in the Mount Hood National Forest above Estacada along an apparent air pollution gradient. The plant community was measured at three transects at each control site and lichen surveys were conducted. Four soil samples were collected at each site, dried at 35oC until weight remained constant and sieved to reduce to fine soil particle size. The samples will be assessed using an elemental analyzer to determine total nitrogen and total carbon.

Comments

Presenter: Wes L. Hanson

This research was funded by the Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds Scholar Award (Wes) and a Faculty-Student Summer Collaborative Research Grant (Robin).

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May 15th, 12:15 PM May 15th, 1:30 PM

Soil Nitrogen and Carbon in Urban and Rural Forests

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Previous work by Dr. Nancy Broshot has revealed high tree mortality and low recruitment (new seedlings) in an urban forest (Forest Park in Portland, Oregon). A series of lichen surveys in 2013 showed the lichen community has shifted to one dominated by lichens tolerant of and thriving on high nitrogen levels. To ascertain if nitrogenous air pollution could be a cause of low recruitment, we measured the level of nitrogen and carbon in the soil at 32 sites in Forest Park (24 permanent sites and 8 conifer recruitment sites). We also added 3 control sites in the Mount Hood National Forest above Estacada along an apparent air pollution gradient. The plant community was measured at three transects at each control site and lichen surveys were conducted. Four soil samples were collected at each site, dried at 35oC until weight remained constant and sieved to reduce to fine soil particle size. The samples will be assessed using an elemental analyzer to determine total nitrogen and total carbon.

 

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