Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Subject Area

Nursing

Description

Background: Burnout includes fatigue, apathy and/or frustration that interfere with job performance and home life (Walsh, 2013). Compassion fatigue is a combination of physical, emotional and spiritual exhaustion combined with the care of patients with significant pain and physical distress (Walsh, 2013). A study by Journal of Nursing found that 82% of ED nurses had moderate to high levels of burnout and 86% had moderate to high levels of compassion fatigue (Hooper, Craig, Janvrin, Wetsel, & Reimels, 2010). This information prompted a study to be conducted on local ED nurses.

Purpose: The question addressed was: What is the amount of burnout or compassion fatigue in Emergency Department (ED) nurses of a local hospital?

Methods: The Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL) was used to measure burnout and compassion satisfaction (which in turn determines compassion fatigue) in 15 ED nurses.

Results: Our results found that the ED nurses had decreased compassion satisfaction. There is no evidence that these nurses have high amounts of burnout.

Discussion/Recommendations: This study found there was a decrease in compassion satisfaction, but not a high incidence of nurse burnout. While burnout is not seen in the study we conducted, a decrease in compassion satisfaction could lead to burnout over time. Our recommendation is to ask the ED nurses ways to decrease burnout and compassion fatigue.

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May 15th, 12:15 PM May 15th, 1:30 PM

Nurse Burnout in the Emergency Department

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Background: Burnout includes fatigue, apathy and/or frustration that interfere with job performance and home life (Walsh, 2013). Compassion fatigue is a combination of physical, emotional and spiritual exhaustion combined with the care of patients with significant pain and physical distress (Walsh, 2013). A study by Journal of Nursing found that 82% of ED nurses had moderate to high levels of burnout and 86% had moderate to high levels of compassion fatigue (Hooper, Craig, Janvrin, Wetsel, & Reimels, 2010). This information prompted a study to be conducted on local ED nurses.

Purpose: The question addressed was: What is the amount of burnout or compassion fatigue in Emergency Department (ED) nurses of a local hospital?

Methods: The Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL) was used to measure burnout and compassion satisfaction (which in turn determines compassion fatigue) in 15 ED nurses.

Results: Our results found that the ED nurses had decreased compassion satisfaction. There is no evidence that these nurses have high amounts of burnout.

Discussion/Recommendations: This study found there was a decrease in compassion satisfaction, but not a high incidence of nurse burnout. While burnout is not seen in the study we conducted, a decrease in compassion satisfaction could lead to burnout over time. Our recommendation is to ask the ED nurses ways to decrease burnout and compassion fatigue.

 

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