Submission Title

Prospective Co-Rumination Tendencies and Adjustment Style in the First Semester of College Freshmen

Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Subject Area

Psychology

Description

Infants form attachments with their primary caregivers. The attachment style between the child and her/his primary caregiver forms the basis for future relationships. This style becomes particularly important as a young adult establishes a life outside the immediate family (e.g., starting college). Attachment is an emotional bond between two people. Co-rumination is a communication style characterized by the frequent discussion of a problem, developed as a child ages and influenced by the child’s environment, particularly attachment style. We are studying how attachment style affects a person’s co-rumination tendencies. In this study, 100 college freshmen were surveyed longitudinally with a self-report measure. In our sample we found a correlation between attachment and co-rumination tendencies, including topic frequency and the dwelling effect. Since attachment type and co-rumination habits are significant, knowing these results would promote successful college adjustment, romantic and platonic relationships, and healthy personal habits.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
May 16th, 4:30 PM May 16th, 6:00 PM

Prospective Co-Rumination Tendencies and Adjustment Style in the First Semester of College Freshmen

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Infants form attachments with their primary caregivers. The attachment style between the child and her/his primary caregiver forms the basis for future relationships. This style becomes particularly important as a young adult establishes a life outside the immediate family (e.g., starting college). Attachment is an emotional bond between two people. Co-rumination is a communication style characterized by the frequent discussion of a problem, developed as a child ages and influenced by the child’s environment, particularly attachment style. We are studying how attachment style affects a person’s co-rumination tendencies. In this study, 100 college freshmen were surveyed longitudinally with a self-report measure. In our sample we found a correlation between attachment and co-rumination tendencies, including topic frequency and the dwelling effect. Since attachment type and co-rumination habits are significant, knowing these results would promote successful college adjustment, romantic and platonic relationships, and healthy personal habits.