Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Subject Area

Political Science

Description

Transnational advocacy networks play a major role in internationalizing local grassroots movements through connections with international activists, foreign governments, and other powerful actors. However, in some cases, unequal power dynamics between members of networks produces less than optimal outcomes for local groups. This study compares two cases of grassroots movements in the Brazilian Amazon that became part of larger transnational advocacy networks to examine why some groups benefit from participation while others do not. The results suggest that groups with greater resources and stronger organizational capacities prior to contact with outside activists tend to benefit while those with few resources and weak organizational capacities do not experience the same benefits. These findings have important ramifications for the notion of mutually empowering relationships among network members and the effectiveness of transnational movements at serving local interests.

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Unintended Consequences of Transnational Activism: Case Studies from the Brazilian Amazon

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Transnational advocacy networks play a major role in internationalizing local grassroots movements through connections with international activists, foreign governments, and other powerful actors. However, in some cases, unequal power dynamics between members of networks produces less than optimal outcomes for local groups. This study compares two cases of grassroots movements in the Brazilian Amazon that became part of larger transnational advocacy networks to examine why some groups benefit from participation while others do not. The results suggest that groups with greater resources and stronger organizational capacities prior to contact with outside activists tend to benefit while those with few resources and weak organizational capacities do not experience the same benefits. These findings have important ramifications for the notion of mutually empowering relationships among network members and the effectiveness of transnational movements at serving local interests.

 

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