Location

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

Subject Area

Sociology

Description

The concept of national identity is prevalent in contemporary debate as it is constantly being challenged due to factors such as immigration, globalization, and significant social transformation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of social disruption, or societal collapse, on sense of national identity. Societal collapse raises many fundamental questions of sociological concern. Specifically, what are the consequences of structural breakdown in a society? Also, do individuals’ identities become compromised in the process of such social disruption? To address these questions, surveys were conducted with individuals in Russia. I argue that, with the establishment of the Soviet Union, the previously established Russian identity was forcibly merged with a new “Soviet” identity. Once the Soviet Union fell, the old “Russian” identity resurfaced. Also, subjective and objective forces played a key role in determining the identities that drove individuals to occupy positions in society based on the emerging internal shift. Findings and implications are discussed.

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Effect of Social Disruption on Sense of National Identity

Jereld R. Nicholson Library

The concept of national identity is prevalent in contemporary debate as it is constantly being challenged due to factors such as immigration, globalization, and significant social transformation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of social disruption, or societal collapse, on sense of national identity. Societal collapse raises many fundamental questions of sociological concern. Specifically, what are the consequences of structural breakdown in a society? Also, do individuals’ identities become compromised in the process of such social disruption? To address these questions, surveys were conducted with individuals in Russia. I argue that, with the establishment of the Soviet Union, the previously established Russian identity was forcibly merged with a new “Soviet” identity. Once the Soviet Union fell, the old “Russian” identity resurfaced. Also, subjective and objective forces played a key role in determining the identities that drove individuals to occupy positions in society based on the emerging internal shift. Findings and implications are discussed.

 

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